Upcoming Exhibits - Octagon Center for the Arts
Exhibits

Upcoming Exhibits

SNAPSHOT 2016

A PHOTOGRAPHY-ONLY EXHIBIT SHOWCASING THE WORK OF ARTISTS 

WITHIN 150 MILES OF AMES, IOWA

Victoria Herring, Abstract Reflection Artwork Credit: Victoria Herring, Abstract Reflection

ON DISPLAY JUNE 3 - JULY 30, 2016, MAIN AND SWEENEY GALLERIES

Showcasing the works of regional photographers.
Opening reception: Friday June 3, 5:00 - 8:00 PM during Art Walk in Downtown Ames. 


LARRY MENDENHALL:

PLACES OF SPIRIT AND LIGHT

ON DISPLAY JUNE 24 - AUGUST 20, 2016, COMMUNITY GALLERY
Opening reception: June 23, 5:30 to 7 PM

Larry Mendenhall began concentrating on landscape photography in the late ‘90’s and began Quiet Places Photography in 2003. Since then, his work has appeared in numerous juried art shows and exhibitions.

 In 2009, he began a different project called “Places of Spirt and Light”, a study of churches in rural Iowa. Mendenhall takes his experience as a former newspaper photographer and editor to this series. Part of the “Places of Spirit and Light” portfolio was published in Issue #109 of LensWork magazine.

Other honors include winning of Best of Show in the Octagon Art Center (Ames, IA) Snapshot photo contest; selection of two photos for the Vet’s Auditorium renovation (Des Moines, IA); an appearance in Iowa Public Television’s Iowa Outdoors segment on Iowa State Fair’s Photography Salon; Best of Show at the Octagon Arts Festival in Ames, IA; and selected as an Artist in Residence at Ashford College in Clinton, IA.

His photographs are in the permanent collections at Mary Greeley Hospital; the Municipal Fire and Police Retirement System of Iowa, The University of Iowa Library, and are on display in the Environmental Protection Agency’s Kansas City office. The Iowa Farm Bureau Association of Iowa selected Mendenhall’s Summer Storm to represent the state at the Farm Bureau National Headquarters in Washington, D.C.

About The Project

"Iowa’s older rural churches are simple structures that may lack the sophistication of newer churches. But it is the simplicity of these churches that enhance their feeling of being sacred places. “Places of Spirit and Light” conveys the “sacred place” aspect of these churches, and not their architectural or historical interest.

Discovering a way to photograph an intangible feeling like sacredness was the project’s biggest challenge. A friend of mine stated it perfectly with the question, "How do you photograph something that can't be seen?" The fact that churches are visually very similar added to the challenge.

My approach was to look beyond the surface similarities and to study the light in each church. The interplay of light and shadow makes each church a unique and visually different space from the next one down the road. I used light to reveal new shapes in common elements — such as pews — while using shadows to subdue unwanted detail. This emphasis on light and shadow created the feeling of “sacred” that I was hoping to capture.

The initial photographs for the project were made in a span between 2009 and 2013. During that time, I drove over 16,000 miles to visit approximately 400 churches, photographing 125 of them, and making close to 4,500 exposures. And I think it unlikely that I’ve even covered a fifth of the rural churches in the state."

                           - Larry Mendenhall

LensWork magazine published some of the photographs from the exhibit in 2013. For more images, visit: http://larrymendenhall.zenfolio.com/placesofspiritandlight

 

 


PRISCILLA SAGE FIBER ART

ON DISPLAY AUGUST 26 - OCTOBER 15, 2016, COMMUNITY GALLERY

Priscilla Sage's brilliant, light, free-hanging fabric sculptures have been exhibited in galleries throughout the United States and across the world. The pieces, which evoke lyrical images, are conceptual studies of form, light, and space. Sage's radiant colors derive from mastery of disperse dyes and direct painting on silver mylar fabrics. The rich and complex stitched surfaces frequently include a glimpse of Japanese papers or shining copper-gold interiors.

Sage is a distinctly unconventional fiber artist, although the legacy of expert piecework shines through her constructions. Much of her award-winning work in mobile - a sense of balance replaces wires and internal supports. As the multiple sculptural forms move through light and shadow, the colors subtly change. Sage's wall relief pieces also rely on optical illusion and movement. ... ...For public spaces Sage makes large installations of multiples. Floating gently in space they can be seen as underwater gardens, flocks of iridescent birds, playful spinning tops, or ever-changing, endlessly fascinating kaleidoscopes.  — Jane Zaring, Read more

"Color has a voice that is deeply human, and the emotional content of my pieces comes through color and color relationships. Having decided the value and intensity of each color, I glaze silver Mylar fabric with layers of acrylic paints and then draw or stencil over that. There is a fluid quality as one color merges into the next and the eyes follow the stripes, going in and out from light to dark. The silver underneath influences the color, and the line work creates richness and illusions on the surface."  — Priscilla Sage


FOUNDERS EXHIBIT: CELEBRATING 50 YEARS

ON DISPLAY AUGUST 26 - OCTOBER 29 2016, MAIN AND SWEENEY GALLERIES

 

Robinson earned a Master of Fine Arts degree in printmaking from Iowa State University after graduating from Olivet Nazarene University with a bachelor’s degree in painting. He has taught printmaking workshops at Iowa State University, the University of Wisconsin, Central College, the Des Moines Art Center, the Pella Community Art Center and various other colleges. He also served as an artist in residence at the Weir Farm Art Center in Connecticut.

- See more at: http://www.nwciowa.edu/news/press/3717/northwestern-to-feature-work-by-pella-artist#sthash.Zf7WVqOk.dpuf
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